What Your Property Manager Says About You… After You Vacate

Property manager tenancy references – everybody has a story… and like any story there’s three sides – yours, theirs and the truth.  So how do the ‘stories’ differ?

Tenancy references are written according to the experience of the property management agency, just like agency feedback on Facebook posts and Google ratings are written in accordance with the customer’s experience.

Every single person in the world could experience exactly the same thing and yet have a different perspective.  Take New Years’ Eve for example – some people will watch fireworks in awe and say it was magical.  Others will complain about the noise and the fact that it upset their dog.

Same fireworks.  Different perspective.

Tenancies can be very similar.  A tenant who has lost blood, sweat and tears over a vacate inspection is never going to be happy if the property manager comes in and notices the lightshades have been missed.

Does it mean the property manager was wrong?  No.  Does it mean the tenant didn’t try really hard?  Not at all.

Just different points of view.

Property Manager Tips for an A1 Rating

So, how can you be sure to secure yourself an A1 rating?  Here’s the stuff you should know about what your property manager is asked, and what they are likely to say:

  1. Was the tenant listed on the general tenancy agreement?

This one is an easy one.  We tick yes, or no.  If you didn’t sign the lease, you can’t hope to get a written reference from the agent.  Why?  Because we can’t give a reference for an approved occupant, only somebody listed on the general tenancy agreement as a signatory.

  1. What dates did the tenant occupy the property?

Again, an easy one.  No point in lying or trying to fudge figures as we do check and we’ll find out pretty soon if you’ve only been there for a few months but stated it was a year.

  1. Is the tenant breaking their lease?

Lease breaks are stressful for all concerned.  The owner is fretting that their tenants are going to do a runner.  The tenants are fretting that they can’t afford the fees.  And the agent is fretting that the tenants and owners are fretting.  The best thing to do is be open and honest with your property manager.  If you are considering breaking your lease, tell your agent!  More often than not they will try to actively help you to release the property quickly.  In fact, we’ve just leased 2 properties in the last week within a matter of days where our tenants needed to move on sooner than anticipated.  Because our tenants were upfront, we were able to proactively look for replacements.  Finding out through another agent is never well received.

  1. Was the tenant ever in arrears?

Your agent will provide a tenant ledger so that we can see for ourselves.  If you’re behind on a regular basis, it’s guaranteed that you’ll go to the bottom of the pile.  Property managers are busy and don’t have time to chase tenants continually for rent.  If you have been in arrears throughout your tenancy, be prepared that this will affect your opportunities.

  1. Were there any notice to remedy breaches issued?

As property managers, we like to know if we are going to accept tenants who have a history of unapproved pets, unapproved occupants, late payments, damage to the property, unapproved pools and noise complaints.  Breach the tenancy agreement you signed and your agent will divulge this information.

  1. Did the tenants have any pets?

This question is asked so that we know if tenants have omitted their pet from their application.  Not because we don’t like animals, but because some owners very strictly do not want them.  We have hearts and hate to ask people to get rid of their beloved dog or cat because they haven’t disclosed it in the beginning.

  1. Was the tenant amicable throughout the tenancy?

More and more we are seeing this question on rental reference requests.  You can pay your rent on time and look after the property beautifully but if you’re abusive, chances are your property manager is going to tell us.  More flies are caught with honey than vinegar.  It’s not about sucking up at all but there’s a way to work amicably with your property manager.

  1. Would you rent to the tenant again?

This is a question many agents choose not to answer.  When they don’t, we ask why.  The majority of our tenants we would DEFINITELY rent to again and we’re happy to shout it to the world as they’ve made our job enjoyable.

 

Really, it all comes down to relationship building from BOTH parties.  Property managers get a bad rap every now and again but the one consistent, no matter which agency you choose, is that we all love tenants who pay their rent, keep the house clean, lawns mowed, don’t cause damage, ask permission for any changes to their tenancy and are pleasant to deal with.

Likewise, great tenants are very valuable and should be treated as such.  A shout out to all of our wonderful tenants who treat their home like they would if they owned it.  You beautiful people make our job wonderful.

Tell us your experience.  Good or bad.